Voice America with Cynthia Brian

Wednesday, February 26th at 4:15 PST listen in!

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2 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Sheldon Rampton
    Feb 27, 2014 @ 04:34:00

    I just wanted to write a comment to say that I appreciated your column in Slate about the Woody Allen/Dylan Farrow allegations so much that I bought and read your book, which was also excellent.

    http://www.slate.com/articles/double_x/doublex/2014/02/samantha_geimer_to_dylan_farrow_and_other_victims_the_only_thing_you_have.html

    What I found so striking about the Slate article was its clear focus on victim’s rights and on what is important for victims to heal and lead happy lives. Most of the commentaries about the Allen/Farrow affair have focused on who to believe and who to punish, as though outrage and punishment are necessary preconditions before anyone can move on or healing can begin. Your column focused instead on the idea that healing can happen regardless of what other people believe or say or might have done to you. That is a very powerful and important insight, and I hope that the Allens and Farrows and any other victims of rape, abuse or injustice can learn that lesson and take it to heart.

    I just finished reading your book tonight. It thought it was an engaging (and sometimes humorous) story that seemed utterly believable and consistent with the way I think many teenagers might think and feel about the experiences you went through. It also gave me a lot to think about with respect to the very concepts of law and justice and how they are implemented. I found myself thinking a lot about the meaning of words like “rape” and “victim” and realizing that there are huge differences in what those words mean from case to case, depending on the particulars of the individual incident as well as the personality of the victims and perpetrators. We all have assumptions about what those words mean, which then become expectations and prescriptions for how victims (and perpetrators) should be expected to think and behave.

    It seems that you have tried for much of your life to avoid being defined as “the girl who was raped by Roman Polanski.” In writing your book, you seem (perhaps paradoxically) to have embraced that role, if only so you could tell your story on your own terms. Perhaps you still have mixed feelings about putting yourself forward in public. If so, I want to at least thank you for doing so, because you clearly have a lot of insight and wisdom to share.

    Reply

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